International Human Resource Management (IHRM) is about the worldwide management of human resources. This course provides students with an understanding of IHRM as well as the skills to analyze IHRM in contemporary firms. The course will be divided into three sections. The first section introduces the prevalent ways of thinking about IHRM. The second section deals with the core functional areas in how multinational companies manage their workforce and global talent. The third and final section focuses on specific contextual factors that influence the design, implementation and adaptation of IHRM policies and practices.

Cross-cultural management skills are an essential success factor in today’s volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous global business world. As national, professional, generational and organizational cultures affect the ways leaders and employees think, behave and communicate, cross-cultural management research aims to improve the interaction and management of people from different cultures. This seminar provides students with a deeper understanding of current debates in this field and encourages them to critically discuss seminal theoretical frameworks and empirical results. Participants gain in-depth knowledge on selected topics of timely relevance in cross-cultural management and practice academic writing and argumentation. At the same time, they build their multicultural competence for successful careers in global work environments.

This course aims to create greater awareness of the changing global environment, to provide conceptual frameworks for systematically understanding cross-cultural management challenges, to enhance students’ understanding of workforce diversity, and to develop their competence in intercultural communication and cross-cultural interactions. Upon completion of this course, students have the required knowledge and skills to write a B.Sc. thesis at the professorship of international management.

Impressive economic growth rates are seen in almost all Asian countries nowadays. Whereas some observers consider Japan as a mature country with low growth rates, Japan`s economy is in fact the third biggest in the world with a GDP much higher than that of Germany. The reason for such a high GDP is the competitiveness of Japanese firms, which are often leaders in their specific fields. Underlying this high competitiveness are particular characteristics of Japanese firms such as keiretsu networks and dispatched workers. In this course, we will study these characteristics. A particular focus will be on international Mergers and Acquisitions, a highly prevalent phenomenon in current Japan. The lecturer wrote his PhD more than 20 years ago about this topic and has been teaching and doing research as a professor in Japan ever since.

This class aims to provide knowledge about Japanese management in general and about international Mergers and Acquisitions involving Japanese firms in particular. Having completed this course, students will have dived deeply into Japanese business practices. They will have gained an understanding of the challenges Western managers face when doing business in Japan and possible success factors for intercultural communication and business partnerships. The lecture will present not only textbook knowledge but also tacit knowledge. Results of empirical studies will be discussed along with anecdotes by the lecturer to encourage students’ active engagement with the topic.

In today’s global environment, literally no business remains unaffected by international forces. Whereas some companies are expanding to foreign markets, others are confronted with the entry of international companies in their home locations, and many more companies and communities are affected by the operations of global corporations. Not surprisingly, cross-border activities of businesses are never out of the news. This course is aimed at helping students develop an understanding of the cultural and political environment of today’s global businesses and management issues that are important in such a context. Relevant theories of business ethics, strategic management, organization, production, marketing and human resource management are applied to the specific challenges of organizing and managing cross-border and cross-cultural business activities.

This lecture provides a comprehensive introduction to international business environments, strategies and operations. Having completed this course, students will understand the basics of international business and be able to discuss the challenges confronting international and intercultural management. Through the use of short case studies and the coverage of current issues, students will learn to apply theories and concepts to the solution of practical business problems.


Cross-cultural management skills are an essential success factor in today’s volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous global business world. As national, professional, generational and organizational cultures affect the ways leaders and employees think, behave and communicate, cross-cultural management research aims to improve the interaction and management of people from different cultures. This seminar provides students with a deeper understanding of current debates in this field and encourages them to critically discuss seminal theoretical frameworks and empirical results. Participants gain in-depth knowledge on selected topics of timely relevance in cross-cultural management and practice academic writing and argumentation. At the same time, they build their multicultural competence for successful careers in global work environments.

This course aims to create greater awareness of the changing global environment, to provide conceptual frameworks for systematically understanding cross-cultural management challenges, to enhance students’ understanding of workforce diversity, and to develop their competence in intercultural communication and cross-cultural interactions. Upon completion of this course, students have the required knowledge and skills to write a B.Sc. thesis at the professorship of international management.

In our increasingly globalized business world, global teamwork is of utmost practical importance and attracts much attention in management research. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has shifted large parts of our work into the home office, especially virtual teamwork has gained in importance. In our seminar, we will discuss the technological and coordinative challenges of this organizational form to develop theoretical and practical recommendations for effective global virtual teamwork.

Selected topics for seminar papers will deal with virtual team coordination across time and space, discuss the benefits and challenges of virtual team diversity or analyze decision making, motivation, power relations, leadership, problem solving and knowledge sharing in virtual teams. On this basis, we will identify virtual team competencies and develop recommendations for staffing global virtual teams, for creating an e-culture and for establishing a trustful communication in global virtual teams.